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24.11.04

Summary of Vladimir Rosov's books
"Nicholas Roerich. The Messenger of Zvenigorod"

Book One. The Great Plan1
The cover of the W.Rosov's book "Nikolas Roerich: The Messenger of Zvenigorod. Vol.1"

This book is devoted to the Central-Asiatic expeditions of the well-known Russian artist and thinker Nicholas Roerich (1874-1947), and his search for a promised land in the vast expanses of the Gobi Desert. It sheds light on the Great Plan, as conceived by the Roerich family in order to create a new independent Russian polity in the heart of Siberia, the New Country.

The author thoroughly examines Roerich's concept of the New Country, focusing on his two Asian expeditions to Tibet and to Manchuria. Hence the book is divided into two parts entitled: "The Great Plan" and "The New Country".

In 1920-1930, Nicholas Roerich and his fellow-workers at the Museum that he established in New York made great efforts to lay the foundations of the capital of this New Country in the Russian Altai, with the symbolic name Zvenigorod, the City of the Tolling Bells.

Through this work, Nicholas Roerich was eventually to become a prominant political figure and world leader. In 1923, he set out for a long journey in the East, where he led two expeditions. The first one, the Tibetan Expedition (1927-28), was in fact a secret diplomatic mission of Western Buddhists to the court of the 13th Dalai Lama in Lhasa. On the eve of the trip, Roerich held a round of confidential talks with the leading Bolsheviks in Moscow, G.V. Chicherin, A.V. Lunacharsky and M.A.Trilisser. He discussed with them his Great Plan for the unification of peoples in Asia under the banner of Buddhism, against the imperialistic Great Britain. Roerich also wanted to obtain from the Soviets concessions for the development of mineral resources and arable land in the south-west corner of Altai. These concessions were actually sought by one of the Roerich enterprises in the United States, the New York-based Beluha Corporation.

The second journey, known as the Manchurian Expedition (1934-35), was sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture and was nominally designed to search for drought-resistant grasses on the fringes of the Gobi. Concurrently, preparations were made for signing the Roerich Pact at the Peace Banner Convention in Washington, DC, which was to provide protection for works of art and cultural monuments in times both of war and peace. The event was a link in the chain of high politics into which some outstanding American political actors of the day were involved, such as President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Secretary of Agriculture Henry Wallace, and Senator William Borah. In the course of the expedition Roerich proposed to Wallace to launch the Kansas Project aimed at setting up an agricultural cooperative in Inner Mongolia, a cooperative bank and a number of cultural establishments. All of Roerich's activities under this secret Project marked the beginning of his work for the foundation of the new Mongolo-Siberian State. This work, apart from its clearly political and economic goals, also had some lofty spiritual tasks. The latter were closely linked with the anticipation by the entire Buddhist Asia of the coming of the future Buddha Maitreya.

The research for this book, which was originally begun by the author in 1991, is based on miscellaneous archival sources in the United States, India, the Czech Republic, Great Britain, France and Russia. The most important of these are documents from the Roerich Museum in New York, the Amherst Center for Russian Culture in Massachusetts, as well as from some archival repositories in Russia.

Book Two. The New Country2

This book is devoted to the Central-Asiatic expeditions of the well-known Russian artist and thinker Nicholas Roerich (1874-1947), and his search fora promised land in the vast expanses of the Gobi Desert. It sheds light on the Great Plan, as conceived by the Roerich family in order to create a new independent Russian polity in the heart of Siberia, the New Country.

The author thoroughly examines Roerich's concept of the New Country, focusing on his two Asian expeditions to Tibet and to Manchuria. Hence the book is divided into two parts entitled: "The Great Plan" and "The New Country".

In 1920-1930, Nicholas Roerich and his fellow-workers at the Museum that he established in New York made great efforts to lay the foundations of the capital of this New Country in the Russian Altai, with the symbolic name Zvenigorod, the City of the Tolling Bells.

Through this work, Nicholas Roerich was eventually to become a prominant political figure and world leader. In 1923, he set out for a long journey in the East, where he led two expeditions. The first one, the Tibetan Expedition (1927-28), was in fact a secret diplomatic mission of Western Buddhists to the court of the 13th Dalai Lama in Lhasa. On the eve of the trip, Roerich held a round of confidential talks with the leading Bolsheviks in Moscow, G.V. Chicherin, A.V. Lunacharsky and M.A.Trilisser. He discussed with them his Great Plan for the unification of peoples in Asia under the banner of Buddhism, against the imperialistic Great Britain. Roerich also wanted to obtain from the Soviets concessions for the development of mineral resources and arable land in the south-west corner of Altai. These concessions were actually sought by one of the Roerich enterprises in the United States, the New York-based Beluha Corporation.

The second journey, known as the Manchurian Expedition (1934-35), was sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture and was nominally designed to search for drought-resistant grasses on the fringes of the Gobi. Concurrently, preparations were made for signing the Roerich Pact at the Peace Banner Convention in Washington, DC, which was to provide protection for works of art and cultural monuments in times both of war and peace. The event was a link in the chain of high politics into which some outstanding American political actors of the day were involved, such as President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Secretary of Agriculture Henry Wallace, and Senator William Borah. In the course of the expedition Roerich proposed to Wallace to launch the Kansas Project aimed at setting up an agricultural cooperative in Inner Mongolia, a cooperative bank and a number of cultural establishments. All of Roerich's activities under this secret Project marked the beginning of his work for the foundation of the new Mongolo-Siberian State. This work, apart from its clearly political and economic goals, also had some lofty spiritual tasks. The latter were closely linked with the anticipation by the entire Buddhist Asia of the coming of the future Buddha Maitreya.

The research for this book, which was originally begun by the author in 1991, is based on miscellaneous archival sources in the United States, India, the Czech Republic, Great Britain, France and Russia. The most important of these are documents from the Roerich Museum in New York, the Amherst Center for Russian Culture in Massachusetts, as well as from some archival repositories in Russia.

 


Editor's Notes:

1. The first V.Rosov's book "Nicholas Roerich. The Messenger of Zvenigorod. The Great Plan", published in 2002, is downloaded from on-line library of website "Oriflamma" from the following address: http://www.agni-age.net/zip/rosov_1.zip

2. The second V.Rosov's book "Nicholas Roerich. The Messenger of Zvenigorod. The New Country", published in 2004, is downloaded from this address: http://www.agni-age.net/zip/rosov_2.zip

 


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